Knitter makes clothes from the hair of his seven-year-old Samoyed

The dog’s hair! Knitter makes clothes from the hair of his seven-year-old pet, the Samoyed, known for their thick white fur

  • Jane Crewe, 57, from Corstohpine, Edinburgh, collects pooch hair
  • She uses a spinning wheel to turn Artemis and Phaidra’s hair into yarn
  • The process involves washing the wool, letting it dry and then spinning it
  • Learned to weave hair during lockdown after receiving it from Samoyed owners

A knitter shared how she made clothes from the hair of her pet dogs.

Jane Crewe, 57, from Corstohpine, Edinburgh, has seven-year-old Samoyeds, a Siberian breed known for their thick white hair.

The 57-year-old collects hair from mutts Artemis and Phaidra and uses a spinning wheel to spin it into yarn.

His process involves washing the wool, letting it dry, which takes two to three days, and then spinning it to make about 50g per hour.

The mother of four then turns the yarn into fluffy hats and scarves.

Jane Crewe wearing one of her designs (pictured)

Jane Crewe, 57 (left and right) from Corstohpine, Edinburgh, has seven-year-old pet Samoyeds – a Siberian breed known for her thick white hair which she collects, using a spinning wheel to turn him into yarn

During the lockdown, she received hair from 100 Samoyed owners to see if she could learn how to spin it and she then sent the yarn back to people.

Ms Crewe, who works in Edinburgh Zoo’s gift shop, said: ‘It’s a bit magical.

‘I like spinning but knitting takes a lot longer, I’m usually quite happy to give it back to the owner.

‘It’s a bit like angora, the down is called ‘halo’. ‘Alpaca wool is just like that.

‘It’s quite durable. You can do so much with it – use it for knitting, yarn or felt.

His process involves washing the wool, letting it dry, which takes two to three days, and then spinning it to make about 50g per hour.  Pictured: The 57-year-old knits next to a basket of yarn

His process involves washing the wool, letting it dry, which takes two to three days, and then spinning it to make about 50g per hour. Pictured: The 57-year-old knits next to a basket of yarn

During the lockdown, she received hair from 100 Samoyed owners to see if she could learn how to spin it and she then sent the yarn back to people.  Pictured: Ms Crewe next to her yarn and spinning wheel

During the lockdown, she received hair from 100 Samoyed owners to see if she could learn how to spin it and she then sent the yarn back to people. Pictured: Ms Crewe next to her yarn and spinning wheel

The 57-year-old is currently knitting a sweater. She uses single ply yarn because the double ply would be too hot to wear and also plans to make a blanket.

Samoyeds are sometimes referred to as “earth clouds” due to their luminous white hair tinged with silver.

The pooches’ undercoat is called “the halo.”

The 57-year-old is currently knitting a sweater.  She uses single ply yarn because the double ply would be too warm to wear.  Ms Crewe also intends to make a blanket.  Pictured: his balls of wool from Samoyed dogs

The 57-year-old is currently knitting a sweater. She uses single ply yarn because the double ply would be too warm to wear. Ms Crewe also intends to make a blanket. Pictured: his balls of wool from Samoyed dogs

Ms Crewe said: ‘You couldn’t spin Labrador or Spaniel hair because there’s no undercoat.

“I learned to shoot a year before the lockdown, but I didn’t really practice enough. I knew that if I wanted to improve, I had to do it every day.

“I made all kinds of things – hats, scarves, teddies.”

The 57-year-old has made a number of items using the wool, including hats, scarves and teddies (pictured)

The 57-year-old has made a number of items using the wool, including hats, scarves and teddies (pictured)

The trend of ‘chiengora’ – Samoyed knitwear – originated in America in the 1970s.

Ms Crewe said the term ‘chiengora’ was coined because an American was spinning and selling items made from Samoyed fur in her local market.

She put the French word for dog “chien” and “gora” together and called her knitwear “chiingora”.

The 57-year-old said: ‘It’s so much nicer than sheep’s wool. You can crochet with it, or make house insulation with it, or make a quilt out of it.

Ms Crewe said the term 'chiingora' was coined because a local woman was spinning and selling items made from Samoyed fur in her local market.  Pictured: Samoyed wool

Ms Crewe said the term ‘chiingora’ was coined because a local woman was spinning and selling items made from Samoyed fur in her local market. Pictured: Samoyed wool

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Elizabeth J. Harless